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Practice Updates

Wilson Center Welcomes New Nurse Practitioners

Summer’s Coming, Save on Sunglasses

Safely Dispose of Unused Medicine

Know and Control Your BP

Wilson Center Welcomes New Nurse Practitioners

We are excited to have three Family Nurse Practitioners joining our team at the Wilson Health Center this month. Here’s a little background about each:
J.D. Brederson, MS, BA, RN, FNP-BC has worked in a variety of health care settings, including hospitals, health centers and urgent care, as well as in social service organizations working with youth and families He has practiced locally and as far away as Alaska. J.D. earned his B.A. in Psychology from Chaminade University of Honolulu, in Honolulu, Hawaii, and both his Bachelor of Science in Nursing and Master of Science in Nursing with a Family Nurse Practitioner Specialty from the University of Rochester. 
Bess Griffin, FNP, (pictured at left) has worked as a nurse in hospitals from California to New York. She also has experience working as an administrative clinical coordinator and clinical specialist, as well as with cardiac patients. Bess earned her Master of Science, Family Nurse Practitioner from Pace University. 
Barbara Herman, FNP, (pictured at right) most recently served at Highland Hospital, conducting employee health assessments, and teaches in the nursing department at St. John Fisher College. She also has worked with us in Urgent Care by Lifetime Heath. Barbara brings with her experience in emergency, palliative care, pediatrics, and orthopedics within several Rochester hospitals, as well as in a nursing home and a women’s health clinic. 
Please join us in welcoming these three new health care providers to Wilson!

Summer’s Coming, Save on Sunglasses

Memorial Day Weekend marks the unofficial start of summer and these are the last few weeks to save on new sunglasses. The Optical Shop is offering 50% off all sunglasses—prescription and non-prescription—until May 19. 

Safely Dispose of Unused Medicine

It’s good to “spring clean” your medicine cabinets along with the rest of the house, but not all medicines should be thrown away or flushed without first taking some precautions, according to the Lifetime Health pharmacists. Many drugs can be particularly harmful if used or misused by someone other than the person for whom they were prescribed, including children and animals who may come across the medicine accidentally. There are also environmental concerns with flushing medicine down the toilet; studies have found trace levels of drug residues in rivers and lakes, as well as some community drinking water sources. 
Before you get rid of medicine, look for disposal instructions on the label or information packet. If it’s a drug that can be thrown away, here are some quick things to do:
  • Remove pills or tablets from their original containers and mix them with an undesirable substance, such as used coffee grounds, dirt or kitty litter (this makes the drug less appealing to children and pets, and unrecognizable to people who may intentionally go through the trash seeking drugs).
  • Place the mixture in a sealable bag, empty can, or other container to prevent the drug from leaking or breaking out of a garbage bag.
Controlled substances, such as oxycodone, fentanyl and diazepam, should be dropped off at one of the Drug Enforcement Administration’s Controlled Substance centers. You can find a drop-off center near you here.
Talk to your pharmacist if you have questions about the best way to get rid of old medicine. More information about safe medicine disposal also is available online

Know and Control Your BP

May is National High Blood Pressure Education Month. If you have a family history of high blood pressure (hypertension), it’s important to have your blood pressure checked regularly and talk to your doctor about risk factors. If you aren’t sure of your history, or haven’t had your pressure checked in a while, make sure to talk to your doctor about it at your next visit. Controlling high blood pressure can reduce the risk of serious conditions such as heart attack and stroke.